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Welcome to the Glen Cove Dental Offices

Welcome to the Glen Cove Dental Offices

At our Glen Cove dental office we are proud to offer a dedicated team of highly trained doctors including a general dentist, cosmetic dentist, endodontist, prosthodontist, and periodontist. We welcome patients from all over the New York area.

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Our Services

Digital X-rays / Images

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Our office utilizes newest digital X-ray equipment and intraoral our technology, the X-rays and pictures are sent immediately to a computer and can be viewed on a flat screen TV above you chair. The digital imaging software allows our doctor to see a number of different views of the tooth to determine the best course of treatment. Furthermore, all of the images and X-rays you all of the problem areas. With our technology, you have an opportunity to see exactly what our doctor see.

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Digital X-ray and image technology allows us to detect especially small areas of decay between teeth and identify
decay occurring beneath existing fillings, bridges, and crowns. Furthermore, the technology reveals abscesses (an infection at the root of a tooth or between the gum and a tooth) and bone loss that accompanies gum disease or infection. Finally, the technology is used to screen for cysts, some types of tumors, and other developmental abnormalities.

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There are several types of intraoral X-rays, each of which
shows different aspects of teeth.

  • Bite-wing X-rays show details of the upper and lower teeth in one area of the mouth. Each bite-wing shows a tooth from its crown to about the level of the supporting bone. Bite-wing X-rays are used to detect decay between teeth and changes in bone density caused by gum disease. They are also useful in determining the proper fit of a crown and the marginal integrity of fillings.
  • Periapical X-rays show the whole tooth — from the crown to beyond the end of the root to where the tooth is anchored in the jaw. Periapical X-rays are used to detect any abnormalities of the root structure and surrounding bone structure.
  • Occlusal X-rays are larger and show full tooth development and placement. Each X-ray reveals the entire arch of teeth in either the upper or lower jaw.

Oral Cancer Screening

Oral cancer is defined as cancer of the lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, palate, throat, parts for the nose, and larynx. According to the Center for Disease Control, each year, more than 30,000 new cases of oral cancer are diagnosed and over 8,000 deaths occur as of result of it.

Tobacco use (cigarette, pipe, cigar smoking, and chewing), particularly when combined with heavy alcohol consumption, has been identified as the primary risk factor for approximately 75% of oral cancers in the United States. However, other factors that can place a person at risk for these cancers are viral infections, immune deficiencies, poor nutrition, exposure to ultraviolet light (a major cause of cancer to the lips), and certain occupational exposures.

Persons who have oral cancer often develop multiple primary lesions and are more likely to develop a secondary cancer somewhere within oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, larynx, or lungs. 95% oral cancer occurs among persons aged greater than 40 years, and the average age at diagnosis is 60 years. Despite aggressive combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, the average 5-year survival rate for oral cancer is quite poor at 50%. In contrast to other cancers (e.g. breast, colorectal, and prostate cancers) the overall U.S. survival rate from oral and pharyngeal cancer has not improved during the past
16 years.

Methods used to treat oral cancers (surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy) are disfiguring and costly. Preventing high risk behaviors, that include cigarette, cigar or pipe smoking, use of smokeless tobacco, and excessive use of alcohol are critical in preventing oral cancers. Therefore, diagnosing cancers at an early stage is crucial to improving survival rate and reducing morbidity.

Signs and Symptoms of Oral Cancer:

  • A mouth sore that fails to heal or that bleeds easily
  • A white or red patch in the mouth that will not go away
  • A lump, thickening or soreness in the mouth, throat, or tongue
  • Difficulty chewing or swallowing food

Most early signs of oral cancer are painless and are difficult to detect without a thorough head and neck examination by a dental or medical professional.

Oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers occur on anatomic sites that lend themselves to early diagnosis and treatment. Detection of oral cancer through periodic medical and dental examinations can significantly reduce the risk of these life-threatening cancers.

Oral Cancer Screening

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Why VELscope?

The VELscope exam takes about two minutes as part of a regular hygiene check-up, involves no pain or inconvenience,
and is completely safe .The VELscope system helps dental professionals visualize abnormalities in the mucosal tissues of your lips, mouth and upper throat othervize not visible to the naked eye.

VELscope2

Importance of Early Detection

Can be the difference between life and death. Oral cancer is most often discovered in late stages, when the 5-year survival rate is only around 30%. When discovered early, however, the survival rate leaps to about 82%. Your 2-minute VELscope exam can turn a routine dental visit into a life-saving experience. We recommend annual oral cancer screening for most of our patients (twice a year for those who smoke or chew tobacco).

Velscope3

How Does the VELscope Work?

The VELscope’s blue light “excites” molecules (called “fluorophores”) deep within the layers of oral mucosal tissues. In turn, those fluorophores emit their own light (fluorescence),
in shades of green, yellow and red. Our doctors are able to interpret these colors and identify potential abnormalities.

Gum Disease Treatment

Periodontal or gum disease is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. Left untreated, periodontal disease results in significant decay of jaw bone around teeth. In essence, the bone “melts” away exposing the roots which causes the teeth to fall out. Furthermore, the growing body of evidence suggests that periodontal disease is interrelated with such dangerous health conditions as heart disease, lung infections, and premature births (click here for clinical research).

The early and moderate periodontal disease may exhibit few, if any, symptoms. However, warning signs of advanced
periodontal disease may include red, swollen, or bleeding gums; persistent bad breath; permanent teeth that are loose or separating; or changes in the way your teeth fit together when you bite.

CHECKING FOR PERIODONTAL DISEASE

During each routine checkup, we will examine you for periodontal disease. A periodontal probe is used to determine if there is any breakdown in the gum and bone tissue attachment or if pockets – unhealthy spaces between your gums and teeth – have developed due to inflammation. Periodontal probe allows us to measure the depth of the pockets around your teeth. The deeper the pocket, the larger the scope of the periodontal disease. There are many stages and forms of periodontal disease, including:

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HEALTHY GUNM

Gums are firm and attached to teeth. There is no bone loss and roots are not exposed. Teeth do not wobble in place

Stage 1: GINGIVITIS

Some gum inflammation, separation, and bleeding. However, no significant bone loss, thus teeth are still secure in their place.

Stage 2: EARLY PERIODONTITIS

Clearly visible gum inflammation, greater separation, pronounced bleeding. Beginning stages of bone loss and tooth movement. However, if treatment begins during this stage, most your teeth can be saved.

Stage 3: ADVANCED PERIODONTITIS

Significant damage to bone and supporting gum tissues. Teeth are quite loose. Yellow / brown plaque is visible from a distance. If treatment begins during this stage, some of the teeth may have to be extracted and replaced with bridges, dentures, and implants.

Stage 4: SEVERE PERIODONTITIS

At this stage, gums recede further and separate from the tooth. Jaw bone is eroded by infection. Teeth are most likely to fall out and shift sideways creating gaps between teeth. If treatment begins during this stage, most if not all teeth must be extracted.

Treatment:

None. However, regular checkups are essential to keep your gums healthy

Treatment:

Cleaning to prevent progression of the disease

Treatment:

Scaling Root Planning Oral Irrigation Periodontal Surgery

 

Treatment:

Scaling Root Planning Oral Irrigation Periodontal Surgery

Treatment:

Extractions Tooth Replacement

TREATING AND PREVENTING PERIODONTAL DISEASE

Treatment will depend on the type of periodontal disease and how far the condition has progressed. Treatment options include Scaling, Root Planing, and Oral Irrigation.

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If deep pockets are found and bone has been destroyed, your dentist may recommend periodontal surgery.

To help protect against periodontal disease, it is key to prevent the buildup of plaque. Remember to have regular professional cleanings in addition to brushing and flossing every day.

Regular Dental Exams

Have you ever wondered why the American Dental Association recommends that you complete a dental exam every six months? It is because regular dental visits are essential for the maintenance of healthy teethand gums. In between those six-month examinations, it is important that you work to keep your teeth and gums clean and healthy. If you need additional help, we may even suggest more frequent visits.

Checking your teeth for tooth decay is just one part of a thorough dental examination. During your checkup
appointments we will evaluate the health of your gums, perform a head and neck examination (to look for anything out of the ordinary), examine your mouth for any indications of oral cancer, diabetes, or vitamin deficiencies. Don’t be surprised if we also examines your face, bite, saliva, and movement of your lower jaw joints (TMJs). Finally, we will then clean your teeth and stress the importance of you maintaining good oral hygiene at home between visits.

Healthy
Healthy teeth and gums after a dental cleaning.
nothealthy
Plaque and tartar can build up in a very short time if good oral hygiene is not practiced between visits. Food,
beverages, and tobacco can stain teeth as well.
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If not removed, soft plaque can harden on the teeth (form tartar) and irritate the gum tissue.

THE HEAD & NECK EXAMINATION

  • Examine your face
  • Examine your neck
  • Check your lymph nodes
  • Check your lower jaw joints (TMJs)

THE CLINICAL DENTAL EXAMINATION

  • Take digital x-rays and pictures
  • Look for visual evidence of tooth decay
  • Check for damaged fillings
  • Examine the gums
  • Look for signs of gum disease
  • Check for loose and broken teeth
  • Examine your tongue
  • Check your bite
  • Evaluate any dental appliance you have
  • Check the contact between your teeth

THE DENTAL CLEANING

  • Check the cleanliness of your teeth and gums
  • Remove any plaque and tartar
  • Polish your teeth
  • Floss between your teet
  • Review recommended brushing and flossing techniques

By seeing your dentist on a regular basis and following daily good oral hygiene practices at home, you are more likely to keep your teeth and gums healthy. For healthy teeth and gums, make certain you follow the instructions of your dentist and dental hygienist. And make regular visits to the dental office. Remember, prevention is the key.

Crown Lengthening

Crown-Length

When a tooth is fractured, has a large old filling, or is severely damaged by decay, we may recommend the placement of a tooth crown. Crowns strengthen and protect the remaining tooth structure and can improve the appearance of your smile.

In cases when there is not enough tooth structure to retain a crown due to decay or fracture, additional procedures may be considered prior to crown placement. These may include root canal therapy, post and core build up, or crown lengthening.

In order to achieve a good fit between a crown and your tooth, at least 2 to 3 millimeters of original tooth structure must be present above the jaw bone. If there is not enough of tooth structure available, a surgeon may expose more of the tooth structure by lowering the jaw bone level around a tooth. This procedure allows
sufficient vertical height of tooth structure that will be grasped by the future crown.

The graphic to the right presents the before and after depiction of the crown lengthening procedure.

Sinus Elevation

Prior to implant insertion, a surgeon must verify that the jaw bone is strong and thick enough to hold implants. In some cases, the bone is weakened by infection or part of it could be missing altogether because of a tooth extraction. In cases when the upper jaw is too thin to hold an implant, a sinus lift (sinus augmentation) surgery is performed.

Sinus lift procedure adds bone graft to upper jaw in the area of molars and premolars. The bone is added between the upper jaw and the maxillary sinuses, which are on either side of a patients’ nose.

Bone graft is a man-made or natural material that is used to heal the jaw bone or make it denser. Although bone graft surgery can be prescribed for a number of reasons, it is often used in association with dental implant placements.

If the bone graft surgery is deemed necessary, the doctor would open the gum tissue and place the graft into the bone areas requiring repairs. Once the graft is applied, the bone must be allowed to heal or regenerate. During the gradual process of regeneration, elements of the graft promote the growth of the jaw bone and integrate into it. With time, the new bone growth is indistinguishable from the original bone.

Healing time will vary upon overall health of the patient as well as his or her oral hygiene habits. For instance, smoking has been linked to bone graft failure. However, the average time for an extraction site to heal and be ready for implant placement is about 6 weeks. After the healing is complete, the graft will become the actual bone with densities appropriate for implant placement.

Bone Regeneration

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Bone graft is a man-made or natural material that is used to heal the jaw bone or make it denser. Although bone graft surgery can be prescribed for a number of reasons, it is often used in association with dental implant placements.

Prior to implant insertion, a surgeon must verify that the jaw bone is strong enough to hold implants. In some cases, the bone is weakened by infection or part of it could be missing altogether because of a tooth extraction. If the bone graft surgery is deemed necessary, the doctor would open the gum tissue and place the graft into the bone areas requiring repairs (see Step 1). Once the graft is applied, the bone must be allowed to heal or regenerate. The gradual process of regeneration is depicted Step 2: elements of the graft promote the growth of the jaw bone and integrate into it. With time, the new bone growth is indistinguishable from the original bone (see Step 3).

Healing time will vary upon overall health of the patient as well as his or her oral hygiene habits. For instance, smoking has been linked to bone graft failure. However, the average time for an extraction site to heal and be ready for implant placement is about 6 weeks. After the healing is complete, the graft will become the actual bone with densities appropriate for implant placement. Sometimes additional steps and costs are needed to prepare an area of the jaw for placement of dental implants. These could include:

  • Alveolar ridge augmentation: Grafting bone from other regions of the body to allow more surface area and increased amount of bone for superior implant stability and future success of the implant.
  • Sinus lift: Specifically done on the upper back teeth. This procedure increases the amount of bone where the implant can be safely placed and provide proper support.

Gum Surgery

In addition to color and shade of one’s teeth, the beauty of a smile is also affected by the condition of one’s gums. There is a certain innate gum-to-tooth ration that people consider acceptable in terms of beauty.

Healthy good-looking gums should sit tight against the necks of the teeth. However, many patients have a gummy smile which is caused by excessive and overgrown gum tissue. When the gums extend onto the front surface of the teeth, the natural balance between the tooth length and the gum height may disappear.

Excess gum tissue can usually be removed to reveal a beautiful smile underneath. This is usually accomplished with gingivectomy (gum reduction) and gingivoplasty (gum contour alteration) procedures. During gingivectomy a small incision is done to removes the excess gum tissue. Since natural gum tissue thins as it approaches and surrounds teeth, gingivoplasty is performed to correct the remaining thick and unnaturally shaped gum tissue left after the gingivectomy. The two procedures are usually performed at the same time. Both procedures are a safe and predictable way to remove excess gum tissue and improve the natural appearance of your smile.

Tooth Extraction

Infection, trauma, and need for orthodontic treatment. In addition, extractions of impacted wisdom teeth are routinely performed to reduce the risk of infection and severe pain.

Extractions are often categorized as Simple or Surgical. Simple extractions are performed on teeth that are visible in the mouth. Simple extractions are not invasive and are completed in a relatively short period. Contrary to the ordinary belief, the teeth are not actually pulled. Instead, during a simple extraction, a tooth is rocked back and forth gently until it is loose enough to be removed.

On the other hand, surgical extractions involve the removal of teeth that are not visible or cannot be easily removed. In some instances, teeth may break leaving a root under the gum. In others, the tooth may not erupt fully through the gum. Finally, a tooth may be split into multiple pieces to facilitate its removal. In all of these cases, tooth extractions will require surgical incision or opening of the gums. Although some surgical extractions may be completed under a local anesthesia, the complex cases may requires a general anesthetic.

Within the hour after the extraction, a blood clot must forms in the socket to facilitate the healing; therefore, slight bleeding is quite common during this first hour. However, it is important to note that small amounts of blood mixed in the saliva after extractions are normal up to several days after extraction. The open gum space will gradually fill in with soft gum tissue over a period of four to six weeks. The final closure of the socket with bone growth can take up to six months or more.

Apicoectomy

Retreatment

Root Canal Therapy

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Inside the hard outer shell of each tooth is a specialized area called the pulp or nerve chamber. The pulp chamber contains a system of blood vessels, lymph vessels and nerves which enter from the bone through the root canals. This system provides nourishment for the cells within the tooth.

A tooth’s nerve and pulp can become irritated, inflamed, and infected due to deep decay, repeated dental procedures on a tooth, large fillings, a crack or chip in the tooth, or trauma to the face. If your tooth’s nerve chamber becomes infected root canal treatment is often the only way to save your tooth. Without treatment, the tissue surrounding the tooth will become infected and abscesses may form which will cause severe pain. In worst cases, the tooth may need to be extracted. Furthermore, additional surgical procedure called apicoectomy may be required.

Some indications of the need for root canal treatment may be:

  • Spontaneous pain or throbbing while biting
  • Sensitivity to hot and cold foods
  • Severe decay or an injury that creates an abscess (infection) in the bone

TREATMENT STEPS:

In a root canal or endodontic treatment, we will remove the damaged or infected pulp and replace it with a special filler. Because root canal infection weakens the structure of the tooth, once root canal procedure is performed, a dental crown is required to be placed on the treated tooth. Please click here to learn more about the dental crowns.

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Step 1
After the tooth is anesthetized, an opening is made through the crown into the pulp chamber.
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Step 2
The length of the root canals is determined.
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Step 3
Unhealthy pulp is removed.

 

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Step 4
Canals are filled and sealed. A metal post may be added for structural support or to retain restorative materials.
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Step 5
The tooth is sealed with a temporary filling. Usually a gold or porcelain crown adds further protection.

ROOT CANAL RETREATMENT

In some cases, new infections might emerge after a root canal. If that occurs, a root canal retreatment may be required. Among the likely reasons for the reoccurrence of infection in a treated tooth include:

  • More than the normally anticipated number of root canals in a tooth (leaving one of them uncleaned)
  • A microscopic crack in the root of a tooth
  • A breakdown of the inner sealing material over time, allowing bacteria to recontaminate the inner aspects of the tooth

Post and Core

A post and core is a dental procedure that is considered in the cases when a tooth requires a crown but there is not enough tooth structure to retain it. The loss of tooth structure usually occurs due to either decay or fracture.

A crown must have sufficient foundation. If it is not available, a dentist can build it up using material that will create the “core” for the crown to sit on. Because the core will be sitting on top of the natural tooth, it must be anchored to it for stability purposes. In order to stabilize the core, dentist use small metallic or plastic rods called posts that are inserted into the existing tooth structure. In essence, the post connects tooth to the core and the core connects the crown to the tooth.

Please note, that post and core procedure must be accompanied by the root canal therapy. The root canal procedure is necessary to eliminate the feeling of discomfort associate with core and post procedure. After the root canal has been cleaned and the post is cemented into the tooth, a core material can be packed around the cemented post. Once the material has been cured and formed into a crown foundation, an impression can be taken for to produce the crown.

Dentures

Tooth replacement or restoration, as it is often referred to, can take one of three forms: implant-supported crowns to replace individual teeth; bridges to substitute for multiple adjacent teeth; and dentures for cases when bridges are not possible. Crowns and bridges are cemented to existing teeth or bolted onto implants.Thus, crowns and bridges are non-removable or fixed solutions. In contrast, dentures are designed to clasp onto to adjacent teeth or dental implants, thus making them removable solutions.

There are two main types of dentures: full and partial. With full dentures, a flesh-colored acrylic base fits over your gums. The base of the upper denture covers the roof of your mouth, while that of the lower denture is shaped like a horseshoe to accommodate your tongue.

Conventional_Full_DentureConventional Full Denture
Complete or full dentures are worn by patients who are missing their entire upper or bottom teeth. Usually, a full denture is placed in your mouth after any remaining teeth are removed and tissues have healed. Healing may take several months, during which time you are without teeth. However, in some instances, an immediate full denture can be inserted after extractions. Please note that since the bone supporting the teeth changes its shape as it heals, immediate dentures must be relined within a couple of months after the placement. Because there are no anchor teeth for dentures to clasp onto, this type of prosthesis is designed to hug or wrap around the gums. For better fit and stronger hold, patients can use special temporary adhesives that are applied between the gums and full dentures.

Conventional_Partial_DenturePartial Denture
Removable partial dentures are for patients who are missing some of their teeth on a particular arch (upper or lower jaw). This type of prosthesis is referred to as a removable partial denture because patients can remove and reinsert them when required without professional help.

Implanted_Supported_Denture2Implant-Supported Dentures
Some of the problems associated with removable dentures include increased salivation, sore spots on soft tissues, gagging, accumulation of dental plaque, and loss of taste. Luckily, implant technology can vastly improve the denture-wearing experience by increasing stability and retention factors. In addition, implant supported dentures allow for less gum irritation, reduce the risk of dentures slipping of patient’s mouths, and improves appearance due to less plastic required for retention purposes. Finally, patients with implant supported dentures have increased chewing efficacy and can speak more clearly.

Over time, dentures will need to be relined, remade, or rebased due to normal wear. Rebasing means making a new base while keeping the existing denture teeth. Also, as you age, your mouth naturally changes. These changes cause your dentures to loosen, making chewing difficult and irritating your gums. At a minimum, you should see your dentist annually for a checkup.

Dentures may feel awkward or uncomfortable for the first few weeks or even months. Eating and speaking with dentures might take a little practice. Excessive saliva flow, a feeling that the tongue does not have adequate room, and minor irritation or soreness are also not unusual.

Bridges

Tooth replacement or restoration, as it is often referred to, can take one of three forms: implant-supported crowns to replace individual teeth; bridges to substitute for multiple adjacent teeth; and dentures for cases when bridges are not possible. Crowns and bridges are cemented to existing teeth or bolted onto implants.Thus, crowns and bridges are non-removable or fixed solutions. In contrast, dentures are designed to clasp onto to adjacent teeth or dental implants, thus making them removable solutions.

types-of-bridges
A bridge is used to span an edentulous area (space where teeth are missing). The teeth or implants used to support the bridge are called abutments. The part of the bridge which replaces missing teeth and attaches to the abutments is known as “pontic.” There are different types of bridges, depending on how they are fabricated and the way they anchor to the adjacent teeth. The materials used for the bridges include gold, porcelain fused to metal, or porcelain alone.

Bridges usually restore more teeth than there are root structures to support. For instance, a 3-unit bridge replaces three teeth but it is only supported by two anchor teeth. Similarly, 5-unit bridge
replaces five teeth but it is only supported by three anchor teeth. There have to be at least two anchor teeth: one from each side of the bridge. Bridges are cemented to anchor teeth, thus making them non-removable or fixed solutions. Fixed prosthesis should be placed or removed only by a dental professional.

Conventional bridges required at least two healthy anchor teeth.If none of the adjacent teeth can qualify as anchors, a surgeon must place two or more implant to serve as anchors and then attach a bridge to them. At least two implants are necessary because bridge must be attached to the anchors of similar origin: either natural teeth or implants. A combination of natural teeth and implants will weaken the bridge and it is most likely to fail within a short period.

Crowns

When a tooth is fractured, has a large old filling, or is severely damaged by decay, we may recommend the placement of a tooth crown. Crowns strengthen and protect the remaining tooth structure and can improve the appearance of your smile. Types of crowns include full porcelain crown, porcelain fused to metal crown, and all-metal crowns. Because of the esthetic reasons, we do not recommend the use of all-metal crowns.

Please note that in cases when there is not enough tooth structure to retain a crown due to either decay or fracture, additional procedures may be considered prior to crown placement. These may include root canal therapy,post and core procedure, and/or crown lengthening.

Fitting a crown requires at least two visits to the dentist’s office and follows the following steps:

  • Visit 1: Removing decay, preparing and shaping the tooth to fit the future crown. Making an impression of the shaped tooth. Making and fitting a temporary or transitional crown made out of plastic or metal. In cases when existing tooth structure is not sufficient to hold a crown, a core build up and post may be required.
  • Visit 2: Removing the temporary crown, fitting and adjusting the final crown, and cementing the crown into place.
Non-Precious Metal
fused to Porcelain
Gold fused to PorcelainAll Ceramic PorcelainZirconia Porcelain
Two Layers
Outside: Porcelain
Inside: Metal
Two Layers
Outside: Porcelain
Inside: Gold
Two Layers
Outside: Porcelain
Inside: Porcelain
Single Block of
Solid Zirconia Porcelain
We Recommend:We Recommend:We Recommend:We Recommend:
Back Teeth onlyFront and Back TeethFront Teeth onlyFront and Back Teeth
Why:Why:Why:Why:
Although these crowns are strong, they do not look natural because the base metal is dark and absorbs the light. This makes the crown look gray instead of white. Also the dark metal can be visible at the gum line making your smile less appealing and healthy. Finally, in extremely rare cases, some patients may suffer allergic reactions such as gingival discoloration, swelling and redness.Excellent choice for durable, long-lasting crown that feels and looks just like a real tooth. Since gold is a light-colored metal, it reflects the light allowing the crown to shine and sparkle like a real tooth. Moreover, gold restorations can be cast more accurately and finished to a finer margin at the gum line. In addition, they are corrosion-resistant and can withstand the hostile environment of the oral cavity for extended periods of time.These metal-free restorations provide optimum restorative solution for chipped, cracked or decaying front teeth. Because these crowns do not have a rigid support of a metal base, they cannot take the same amount of constant pressure and grinding as the crowns with metal or gold base can. Therefore, these crowns are ideal for the front teeth only as the majority of chewing is done by the back teeth.This is a SUPER crown! Made out of a single zirconia crystal block, it as strong as a diamond. Virtually chip-proof, solid zirconia crowns are the ideal restoration for bruxers and grinders, implant restorations and areas with limited occlusal space. Designed and milled using CAD/CAM technology, they are sintered for 6.5 hours at 1,530 degrees Celsius. The final Solid Zirconia crown or bridge is glazed to a smooth surface.
Non-Precious Metal fused to Porcelain
Two Layers Outside: Porcelain Inside: Metal
We Recommend:
Back Teeth only
Why:
Although these crowns are strong, they do not look natural because the base metal is dark and absorbs the light. This makes the crown look gray instead of white. Also the dark metal can be visible at the gum line making your smile less appealing and healthy. Finally, in extremely rare cases, some patients may suffer allergic reactions such as gingival discoloration, swelling and redness.
Gold fused to Porcelain
Two Layers Outside: Porcelain Inside: Gold
We Recommend:
Front and Back Teeth
Why:
Excellent choice for durable, long-lasting crown that feels and looks just like a real tooth. Since gold is a light-colored metal, it reflects the light allowing the crown to shine and sparkle like a real tooth. Moreover, gold restorations can be cast more accurately and finished to a finer margin at the gum line. In addition, they are corrosion-resistant and can withstand the hostile environment of the oral cavity for extended periods of time.
All Ceramic Porcelain
Two Layers Outside: Porcelain Inside: Porcelain
We Recommend:
Front Teeth only
Why:
These metal-free restorations provide optimum restorative solution for chipped, cracked or decaying front teeth. Because these crowns do not have a rigid support of a metal base, they cannot take the same amount of constant pressure and grinding as the crowns with metal or gold base can. Therefore, these crowns are ideal for the front teeth only as the majority of chewing is done by the back teeth.
Zirconia Porcelain
Single Block of Solid Zirconia Porcelain
We Recommend:
Front and Back Teeth
Why:
This is a SUPER crown! Made out of a single zirconia crystal block, it as strong as a diamond. Virtually chip-proof, solid zirconia crowns are the ideal restoration for bruxers and grinders, implant restorations and areas with limited occlusal space. Designed and milled using CAD/CAM technology, they are sintered for 6.5 hours at 1,530 degrees Celsius. The final Solid Zirconia crown or bridge is glazed to a smooth surface.

Implants

Implant-350

Tooth replacement or restoration, as it is often referred to, can take one of three forms: crowns to replace individual teeth; bridges to substitute for multiple adjacent teeth; and dentures for cases when bridges are not possible. Traditionally, all three restoration types are attached to the existing healthy teeth. However, with advances in healthcare science and technology, a better and more natural alternative is available. This alternative is the dental implant.

Dental implants are small, sturdy, titanium “roots” or “anchors” that serve as a foundation for crowns, bridges, and dentures, as the root structure would serve for a natural tooth. Implants are placed into the jaw bone in a way that allows bone tissue to grow around them. Once an implant is placed, bone and the implant integrate – or fuse together – so well that they cannot be separated. This allows a dentist to create esthetically pleasing and durable tooth replacement on top of the implants. Dental implants are the ideal treatment for missing teeth because your adjacent healthy teeth won’t have to be grounded to accept a crown or a bride; and removable partial dentures could be worn without ugly and uncomfortable clasps.

There are many types of implants, each designed to address a specific problem or condition. For instance, one piece implants can be used as anchors for crowns to replace front teeth. Mini-implants are used for overdenture attachments. Multiple piece implants are used in cases when existing bone structure requires the implant to be inserted at an angle different from the angle of the original root. Such implant solutions usually consist of three separate parts: implant root, abutment, and prosthesis (crown, bridge, or denture). The implant replaces the root of your tooth; restoration replaces the actual tooth; and the abutment connects the two together. Finally, Implants also vary in thickness to address the issues of bone density: thicker implants are used in cases with lower bone density. Please note, that additional procedure such as bone graft or sinus lift may be required to receive an implant.

In some instances, it is possible to place an implant and restoration in one appointment. However, the treatment plan may require separate procedures to place the implant, allow the bone to heal (up to six months), and then place the restoration.

As you can see, when it comes to implants, there are a lot of different options available to you as a patient. We would be more than happy to analyze your individual case and provide you with a customized treatment plan. Depending on your situation, we will advise you of how long the entire treatment process will take, how many appointments will be necessary and what you can expect after each
procedure.

Nevertheless, below is the general guide of implant solutions. Please note that actual treatment plan can only be determined after thorough examination by a dentist and most likely will differ from the examples below.

Sample Implant Solutions

  • Missing one tooth – single implant capped with a crown
  • Missing two adjacent teeth – two single implant capped with two crowns
  • Missing tree or more adjacent teeth – two to six implants (bone structure permitting) capped with a bridge or a denture

Reasons for Implants

  • Allow for natural function and appearance of your lost teeth
  • Enhance chewing comfort
  • Provide the strength and durability required to eat all food types
  • Increase confidence while smiling, talking and eating
  • Prevent jaw bone loss
  • Prevent movements of remaining teeth
  • Provide support for a partial or full dentures

Dental Implant Care
Once implants have been placed, they require the same maintenance as natural teeth do. Failure to floss, brush, and have periodic dental checkups increases the risk of infection which is a leading cause of implant failure. Finally, smoking should be avoided altogether following implant procedures as it has been associated with high failure rates of dental implants. If cared for properly, an implant restoration can remain in place for more than 30 years.

Tooth Replacement Options

Tooth replacement or restoration, as it is often referred to, can take one of three forms: implant-supported crowns to replace individual teeth; bridges to substitute for multiple adjacent teeth; and dentures for cases when bridges are not possible. Crowns and bridges are cemented to existing teeth or bolted onto implants.Thus, crowns and bridges are non-removable or fixed solutions. In contrast, dentures are designed to clasp onto to adjacent teeth or dental implants, thus making them removable solutions. Crowns and bridges tend to have a higher investment value than dentures; however, they are more stable, durable, and comfortable to wear. Below is a general guide of tooth restorations.

 Missing One ToothMissing Several
Adjacent Teeth
Missing Many
Adjacent Teeth
Missing All
Upper/Lower Teeth
Option #1Implant-supported
Crown
Implant-supported
Crowns for each missing
tooth
Implant-supported
Crowns for each
missing tooth
Implant-supported bridges.
Requires placement of
several implants per arch
Option #2Conventional Bridge
secured to adjacent
natural teeth
Conventional Bridge.
Need at least two anchor
teeth from both sides of
the bridge
Implant Bridge.
Requires at least two
implants
Full Implant-supported
Denture.
Needs placement of
several implants per arch
Option #3Implant Bridge.
If conventional bridge is
not possible. Needs at
least two implants
Conventional Partial
Denture
Conventional
Full Denture
Option #4Conventional Partial
Denture
Missing One Tooth
Option #1Implant-supported
Crown
Option #2Conventional Bridge
secured to adjacent
natural teeth
Missing Several Adjacent Teeth
Option #1Implant-supported
Crowns for each missing
tooth
Option #2Conventional Bridge.
Need at least two anchor
teeth from both sides of
the bridge
Option #3Implant Bridge.
If conventional bridge is
not possible. Needs at
least two implants
Option #4Conventional Partial
Denture
Missing Many Adjacent Teeth
Option #1Implant-supported
Crowns for each
missing tooth
Option #2Implant Bridge.
Requires at least two
implants
Option #3Conventional Partial
Denture
Missing All Upper/Lower Teeth
Option #1Implant-supported bridges.
Requires placement of
several implants per arch
Option #2Full Implant-supported
Denture.
Needs placement of
several implants per arch
Option #3Conventional
Full Denture


Implant-supported Crown
Traditionally, crowns are attached to the existing tooth root. However, if no tooth structure exists, a surgeon can place an implant to serve as anchor and then attach a crown to it. Dental implants are small, sturdy, titanium “roots” or “anchors” that serve as a foundation for crowns, bridges, and dentures, as the root structure would serve for a natural tooth. Implants are placed into the jaw bone in a way that allows bone tissue to grow around them. Please click here to learn more about implants.

Conventional Bridge
Just like conventional crowns, conventional bridges are attached to the existing healthy teeth. However, unlike crowns, bridges usually restore more teeth than there are root structures to support. For instance, a crown can replace only one tooth while a 3-unit bridge can replace three teeth and be supported on two “anchor” teeth. Similarly, 5-unit bridge can replace five teeth and be supported on three “anchor” teeth. There have to be least two anchor teeth: one from each side of the bridge.
Bridges are cemented to anchor teeth, thus making them non-removable or fixed solutions. Fixed prosthesis should be placed or removed only by a dental professional.

Implant-supported Bridges
As we have stated earlier, conventional bridges required at least two healthy anchor teeth. If none of the adjacent teeth can qualify as anchors, a surgeon must place two or more implant to serve as anchors and then attach a bridge to them. At least two implants are necessary because bridges must be attached to the anchors of similar origin: either natural teeth or implants. A combination of natural teeth and implants will weaken the bridge and it is likely to fail within a short period.

Conventional Partial Dentures
Conventional partial dentures are removable solutions designed to clasp onto the adjacent teeth. Removable partial dentures are for patients who are missing some of their teeth on a particular arch (upper or lower jaw). This type of prosthesis is referred to as a removable partial denture because patients can remove and reinsert them when required without professional help.

Conventional Full Dentures
Complete or full dentures are worn by patients who are missing their entire upper or bottom teeth. Because there are no anchor teeth for dentures to clasp onto, this type of prosthesis is designed to “hug” or wrap around the gums. For better fit and stronger hold, patients can use special temporary adhesives that are applied between the gums and full dentures.

Implant-Supported Dentures
Some of the problems associated with removable dentures include increased salivation, sore spots on soft tissues, gagging, accumulation of dental plaque, and loss of taste. Luckily, implant technology can vastly improve the denture-wearing experience by increasing stability and retention factors. In addition, implant supported dentures allow for less gum irritation, reduce the risk of dentures slipping of patient’ smouths, and improves appearance due to less plastic required for retention purposes.

Finally, patients with implant supported dentures have increased chewing efficacy and
can speak more clearly.

Inlays and Onlays

ONLAYS and INLAYS
These are special fillings that are similar to composite or tooth-colored fillings except that they are made in a dental laboratory and require two visits before being placed.

Benefits:
Inlays and onlays are more durable and, with proper care, can last much longer than traditional fillings – up to 30 years. They can be made of tooth-colored composite resin, porcelain, or gold.

We Recommend:
Inlays and onlays are special fillings that are used when not enough tooth structure remains to support a filling but the tooth is not so severely damaged that it needs a crown.

Why:
Inlays are similar to fillings but the entire work lies within the cusps (bumps) on the chewing surface of the tooth. Onlays are more extensive than inlays,covering one or more cusps. Onlays are sometimes called partial crowns.

Bonding

BONDING
This is a procedure in which a tooth-colored resin material is applied and hardened with a special light to “bond” or permanently attach the material to the tooth.

Benefits:
Unlike veneers and crowns, bonding requires less visits to the dental office and removes the least amount of tooth enamel. In addition, unless dental bonding is being performed to fill a cavity, anesthesia is usually not required.

We Recommend:
Small cosmetic changes and for correction of teeth in areas of very low bite pressure. For instance: repairing chipped or cracked front teeth, improving the appearance of discolored teeth, closing spaces between teeth, making teeth look longer, or changing their shape.

Why:
Bonding material does not resist stains and does not last as long as other restorative procedures do. Also, bonding materials can chip and break off the tooth. Because bonding material can chip, it is important to avoid such habits as biting fingernails; chewing on pens, ice, or other hard food objects

Fillings

Dental caries is the medical term for tooth decay or cavities. The decay is caused by specific types of bacteria that produce acid and destroy the tooth’s enamel and the dentin (two outer layers of any tooth). If detected early enough, the decay can be stopped or even reversed (click here for more on topic of decay prevention). However, once there is a break in the enamel, only the dentist can repair the tooth. Then, the standard treatment for a cavity is to remove the decayed material and fill the tooth.

Filings are made of dental amalgam or composite resin. Amalgam is a silver-gray material made from silver, mercury, copper or other metals. For the esthetic reasons, we do not recommend amalgam fillings. Instead, we rely on composite resin in all of our cavity treatments. Composite resin offers a better appearance because it is tooth-colored, and when done properly, the filling is completely indistinguishable on a tooth surface. Please keep in mind, that in some instances, a cavity may be so large that the remaining tooth may not be able to support enough filling material to repair it. In this case, we would suggest one of the following: a ceramic inlay/onlay or crown.

Treating a cavity is a process requiring several steps:

  • The most important step is ensuring that the treatment is a completely painless experience. First, our doctors apply local anesthetic on the gums using a soft q-tip. Once the gum is numb, our doctors make skillful and pain-free injection. In great majority of the cases, our patients don’t even realize that an injection has been done.
  • Next, we will remove the decay, clean the cavity of bacteria and debris, and apply the tooth-colored material in layers.
  • Next, a special light that “cures” or hardens each layer is applied. When the multilayering process is completed, we will shape the composite material to the desired result, trim off any excess material, and polish the final restoration to perfection.

Veneers

VENEERS
Veneers, also known as porcelain veneers or laminates, are very thin custom-made shells made from porcelain or resin and are bonded to the front surface of teeth.

Glidewell-Veneers

Benefits:
Veneers provide a natural tooth appearance and gum tissue tolerates porcelain well. Porcelain veneers are stain resistant and we can adjust their color to make dark teeth appear whiter. Veneers generally don’t require the extensive shaping prior to the procedure that crowns do, yet offer a stronger, more aesthetic alternative.

We Reccommend:
Veneers can be used to modify color, shape, size, or length of healthy teeth only. They are ideal for cases when healthy teeth are discolored, worn down, chipped, misaligned, uneven, or have gaps between them.

Why:
Veneers are not a good choice for individuals with unhealthy teeth, active gum disease, large dental fillings, or for those who have an inadequate amount of existing enamel on the tooth surface. Because veneers are bonded or attached to the existing tooth surface, any existing fillings, crowns or other restorations will not allow the veneer to attach properly creating microscopic gaps between the tooth and the veneer. This will allow bacteria to penetrate under the veneer. As such, tooth decay and the detachment of veneers from the teeth would be inevitable.

Teeth Whitening

if your smile is not as bright as you would like it to be, then whitening may be a good option to consider.Staining is commonly caused by aging, defects within the tooth, use of certain antibiotics during tooth development, and smoking. In addition, your diet can affect the brightness of your smile. The following foods and beverages often contribute to tooth stains on or beneath tooth enamel: coffee, tea, red wine, colored juices, curry, soy, cola drinks, and minerals in well water. Luckily, our doctors can offer you two options in restoring your beautiful smile: in-office and take home whitening.

zoom-before-after-600x137

4_12_WHITENING_BriteSmile_In_Office_System_philips-222x222

OPTION 1: ZOOM! and BriteSmile In Office Whitening

The major benefit of in-office ZOOM!whitening is significant color change in a short period of time. During this procedure we apply whitening peroxide gel to the teeth after the gums have been protected with a special coating and use a special light that activates the whitening gel. Generally, the gel remains on the teeth for several 15 minute intervals that add up to an hour. Depending on the severity of your staining, you may have to return for additional whitening sessions, or use a home whitening system. Please click here (requires Flash) to select your own teeth shade and see how your smile can improve in 45 min with Zoom! Whitening System.

britesmile-158x158
zoom-chairside-whitening-kit-230x189
ZoomLamp-188x188

OPTION 2: TresWhite Take-Home Whitening

Our take-home kits feature whitening gel and ten trays that need to be applied to your teeth for a short period of time daily. With this system you should be able to see the results within 5 to 10 days. Because take-home whitening gel is less powerful than the in-office version, it produces the best results over the longer period of use.

TresWhite2-294x111

Invisalign / Six Month Smiles

Invisalign is a branded orthopedic solution that uses clear, removable teeth aligners instead of traditional metal dental braces. Invisalign aligners are completely transparent which makes them almost invisible from a distance. Clear braces are particularly suited for adults who want to straighten their teeth without the look of traditional metal braces worn by children and adolescents.

In addition to their esthetic benefits, removable braces are more practical in everyday life as they allow patients to eat all types of food without the encumbrance of non-removable braces. Also, the removable nature of Invisalign solution lets patients brush and floss their teeth thoroughly, thus decreasing the likelihood of tooth decay and gum disease.

Invisalign treatments are only recommended for patients who do not have significant tooth decay or gum disease. If you are a good candidate for the Invisalign, we will begin the process by taking dental impressions,x-rays, and photographs of your teeth. The impressions will be scanned to create three-dimensional models of your teeth alignment before and after the treatment. In addition, custom software will simulate the movement of your teeth in stages. A clear resin aligner is manufactured for each stage of the computer simulation. The number of stages and aligners will depend on the difficulty of your case. However, you should be able to move to the new set of aligners every two weeks, or so. After the regular aligner treatment is complete, retainers composed of a similar plastic material may have to be worn, at least at night. Average treatment time is about one year; however, the actual treatment time may vary depending on the complexity of your case.

Like traditional fixed braces, the success of the Invisalign aligners is based on a patient’s commitment to wear the aligners for a minimum of 20–22 hours per day, only removing them when they are eating, drinking, or brushing their teeth. If they are not worn consistently, next aligner in the series will not fit, and a new set of impressions and aligners will be necessary, adding to the cost and the length of the treatment.

Below are some of the common conditions currently treated with Invisalign; if there is a specific issue that you do not see addressed here, please contact us for more information and to see if Invisalign is right for you.

Normal-Bite
NORMAL BITE

This is what a normal teeth alignment should look like.

widely-spaced-teeth
SPACED TEETH
This occurs with abnormal continued growth of the jaw bone. When teeth are missing, this can also be caused by the surrounding teeth shifting due to extra space. Spacing issues between teeth can lead to gum problems (due to lack of protection by the teeth), periodontal pockets and increased risk of periodontal disease.

overly-crowded-teeth
CROWDED TEETH
This occurs when there is simply a lack of room within your jaw for all of your teeth to fit normally. When left untreated, overly crowded teeth can get worse over time. This crowding can lead to plaque accumulation, tooth decay and an increased chance of gum disease.

crossbite-tc
CROSSBITE
This occurs when the upper and lower jaws are both misaligned. It causes one or more upper teeth to bite on the inside of the lower teeth, and can happen on both the front and the sides of the mouth. This can lead to abnormal tooth wear and chipping, and periodontal problems including gum disease and bone loss.

overbite-tc
OVERBITE
What people commonly refer to as an “overbite” is known to dental professionals as “overjet”. It occurs when the upper teeth bite over the lower teeth. It’s typically caused by genetics, bad oral habits, or overdevelopment of the bone that supports the teeth. This can lead to gum disease and chipped or fractured front teeth.

underbite
UNDERBITE
This occurs when the lower teeth protrude past the front teeth. It’s usually caused by undergrowth of the upper jaw, overgrowth of the lower jaw, or both. It can also be caused by missing upper teeth.This can prevent the normal function of front teeth or molars, which can lead to tooth wear. It can also cause painful jaw and joint problems.

Meet Our Doctors

Dr. Mariya Malin

Dr. Mariya Malin

Dr. Mariya Malin-Braylovskaya has received her doctoral degree from SUNY at Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine. Upon graduation from the dental school, Dr. Mariya has joined General Dentistry residency at Brooklyn’s Long Island College Hospital.

Dr. Mariya is versed in all aspects of general and cosmetic dentistry including tooth decay treatment and prevention, porcelain veneers, therapy, dentures, bridges, and much more. Dr. Mariya is an active member of American Dental Association, Academy of General Dentistry, New York State Dental Society, and Second District Dental Society. Dr. Mariya treats each patient as a friend, each case as a personal challenge, and each happy smile as a reward for her work.

Cosmetic Procedures

  • Invisalign / Six Month Smiles
  • Teeth Whitening
  • Veneers
  • Fillings
  • Bonding
  • Inlays and Onlays

 

Tooth Replacement

  • Tooth Replacement Options
  • Implants
  • Crowns
  • Bridges
  • Dentures
  • Post and Core

 

Root Canal Therapy

  • Root Canal Treatment

 

Surgical Procedures

  • Tooth Extraction

 

Essential Procedures

  • Periodic Exams
  • Oral Cancer Screening
  • Digital X-rays / Images

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Dr. Mariya Malin

Advanced Cosmetic, General, and Implant Dentistry
Dr. Iyman Elashmawy

Dr. Iyman Elashmawy

Dr. Elashmawy earned his Doctorate of Dental Surgery at New York University and has been practicing dentistry since 2006. Dr. Elashmawy is an active member of the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Periodontology, which provides him with multiple opportunities to expand his knowledge and provide patients with the most up-to-date care.

Dr. Elashmawy believes that his passion for dentistry lies in restoring health and function to each patient he sees. The most exciting aspect of his job is meeting people from all walks of life. Dr. Elashmawy: "Each person has a unique story to tell, and I find that I learn something new from them every day. I chose dentistry because it is very dynamic and detail-oriented. It has been truly rewarding to see our patients' appreciation at our efforts to give them optimal oral health. Identifying and solving problems is what gets me up in the morning, as well as the smile on a patient's face from a job well done!"

Tooth Replacement

  • Implants

 

Surgical Procedures

  • Tooth Extraction
  • Gum Surgery
  • Bone Regeneration
  • Sinus Elevation
  • Crown Lengthening

 

Essential Procedures

  • Gum Disease Treatment
  • Digital X-rays / Images
  • Dental Cleaning

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Dr. Iyman Elashmawy

Periodontist, Implant Placement

Beth Teper

Hygienist

Ashley

Patient Experience Manager

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Why Choose Us

24 Hour Emergency Service

1

15 Years of
Experience

2

Offering Sedation Services

3

Invisalign Premier Provider

4

Work with Most Insurance Plans

5

Flexible Payment Options

6

Request a Consultation

Complete the Form Below or Call: (516)-759-0086

What Our Patients Say About Us

i m very satisfied of the service i recieved, punctuality is realy respected, and registration is super easy, the staff are so proffesional . and dr. Maria is very modest and she looks to me very interested in her job without affectation.

Mohamed H.

Proffered and friendly Very friendly team. Good work environment and very professional. Thank you

Samir B.

Very friendly staff

Sadia H.

Great service & great staff Very good experience. 5 minute wait, polite staff and clean office.Coming here for years.

William L.

In good hands Excellent fast service. The dentist was very informative during the procedure which was very reassuring. Very pleasant and professional.

Jacqueline W.

Professional,friendly and high quality service

Grazyna K.

Very clean and comfortable. Friendly and professional staff. Dentists were very informative and sincere.

Amina W

I felt very comfortable while Beth, the hygienist worked in my mouth. She was professional and friendly. The front desk staff was also professional.

Norvelle S.

Everything was fantastic and awesome! Thanks everyone for the great service.!

Dzhovid S.

Cleaning Christina did the best cleaning since I been coming to one and only. I hope u keep her!!!!! Dr Mike was ver attentive

Tony N.

Contact Us

70 Glen St #240 Glen Cove,
NY, 11542
(516)-759-0086

Mon:9:00AM - 5:00PM
Tue:9:30AM - 7:00PM
Wed
(closed on some days):
12:00PM - 8:00PM
Thu:9:30AM - 7:00PM
Fri
(closed on some days):
9:30AM - 2:00PM
Sat
(closed on some days):
9:00AM - 2:00PM
Sun:Closed